Manual From Still to Motion: A photographers guide to creating video with your DSLR (Voices That Matter)

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For this article, I focus no pun intended on DSLR systems since they remain—for the time being—the mainstay for fast-action, low-light photography i. There is no margin for missed shots when it comes to capturing key moments for wedding clients. I need speed and accuracy and strive for consistency.

I need to be able to capture those decisive moments as they unfold, but I also want tack-sharp images. Nothing frustrates me more than capturing great content that is slightly out of focus. The issue of precise and accurate focus becomes even more pronounced and problematic when focusing on subjects close to the lens or when using fast lenses with wide-open apertures.

When capturing stationary or slow-moving subjects, I achieve the best results with AF-S.

I acquire and lock focus with the center AF point then quickly recompose and capture. AF points typically light up in red or green when the shutter-release button is halfway depressed. Based on whether or not the subject is moving or stationary, it automatically switches between AF-S and AF-C to achieve focus. Focus lock is typically indicated in the viewfinder by the illumination of a solid circle. This AF mode is ideal for subjects that are stationary. This AF mode is ideal for subjects that are moving.

Single Point — The photographer determines a single AF point manually, and the camera focuses on the subject in the selected AF point, working best with stationary subjects. However, if the subject moves and leaves the selected AF point area, the camera adjusts accordingly based on surrounding AF points and refocuses accordingly.

This setting works best with subjects that are moving unpredictably. Auto — The camera determines which AF point contains the subject and focuses automatically.

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Once the shutter release button is partially depressed, and the camera achieves focus, the photographer recomposes the scene, and the camera automatically shifts to a new AF point to maintain focus for the selected subject. When reading camera manuals or highly technical tutorials, I want to ball up in the fetal position and go to my happy place. So, I urge you to take a deep breath and read on as I speak more prosaically about how to synthesize and integrate this information for the practical application and use in the field.

First, I have achieved my best focus and image sharpness results by using fixed proprietary lenses.

How to Make Stop Motion Videos

Proper lens calibration is also instrumental in achieving optimal results with DSLRs and proprietary lens combinations — both fixed and zooms. Lens calibration is the very first step you must take to achieve consistency and accuracy when it comes to focus.

Canon also allows its shooters to fine-tune and calibrate their pro lenses with their pro bodies, but for right now it remains a manual process. This video provides a great tutorial that enables you to harness the power of this awesome feature!

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Whether you have a newer Nikon that allows you to calibrate automatically, or you own a Canon system and have to perform lens calibration manually, this is the genesis of consistently tack-sharp imagery. My experimentation with AF points and AF modes is equally extensive. I have come to find that center point focus, and Single-Servo AF AF-S delivers more consistently for stationary or slow-moving objects than any other available combination of AF point and focusing mode.

I prefer to use the AF center point to achieve and lock focus, then recompose my scene for final image capture, rather than using AF points located nearer to the edge of the viewfinder. The AF center point discerns contrast and thus achieves focus faster and more accurately than points closer to the edge of the viewfinder or image. Phase detection is most common in DSLRs and employs what is known as a beam-splitter. The beam-splitter directs the light the image onto two different microsensors, thus creating two separate and identical images.

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Best DSLR Cameras 12222 – Reviews & Buyer’s Guide

Phase detection works this way. Contrast detection is arguably more accurate than phase detection, especially when shooting subjects portraits close-up with a wide aperture i.


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  2. Contrast Detection?
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The technology behind it is less cumbersome lightweight and less expensive. We see contrast detection AF systems most commonly in smaller and lighter mirrorless cameras. Phase detection is more robust and more expensive, but it is also more responsive and reliable with subjects that are in motion or moving erratically. The mechanics of contrast detection are much leaner, lightweight and less expensive, but this system is notably slower and less responsive than phase detection.

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For this article, I focus no pun intended on DSLR systems since they remain—for the time being—the mainstay for fast-action, low-light photography i. There is no margin for missed shots when it comes to capturing key moments for wedding clients. I need speed and accuracy and strive for consistency. I need to be able to capture those decisive moments as they unfold, but I also want tack-sharp images. Nothing frustrates me more than capturing great content that is slightly out of focus. The issue of precise and accurate focus becomes even more pronounced and problematic when focusing on subjects close to the lens or when using fast lenses with wide-open apertures.

When capturing stationary or slow-moving subjects, I achieve the best results with AF-S. I acquire and lock focus with the center AF point then quickly recompose and capture. AF points typically light up in red or green when the shutter-release button is halfway depressed. Based on whether or not the subject is moving or stationary, it automatically switches between AF-S and AF-C to achieve focus. Focus lock is typically indicated in the viewfinder by the illumination of a solid circle.

This AF mode is ideal for subjects that are stationary. This AF mode is ideal for subjects that are moving. Single Point — The photographer determines a single AF point manually, and the camera focuses on the subject in the selected AF point, working best with stationary subjects. However, if the subject moves and leaves the selected AF point area, the camera adjusts accordingly based on surrounding AF points and refocuses accordingly. This setting works best with subjects that are moving unpredictably. Auto — The camera determines which AF point contains the subject and focuses automatically.

Focus on Autofocus - Achieving Sharp Images Every Time

Once the shutter release button is partially depressed, and the camera achieves focus, the photographer recomposes the scene, and the camera automatically shifts to a new AF point to maintain focus for the selected subject. When reading camera manuals or highly technical tutorials, I want to ball up in the fetal position and go to my happy place. So, I urge you to take a deep breath and read on as I speak more prosaically about how to synthesize and integrate this information for the practical application and use in the field.

First, I have achieved my best focus and image sharpness results by using fixed proprietary lenses.

Proper lens calibration is also instrumental in achieving optimal results with DSLRs and proprietary lens combinations — both fixed and zooms.